Tutorial: Crocheting lace to a Polo shirt

I had some polo shirts that I loved wearing. Polo shirts are knit shirts like a tennis or golf shirt with vents on the side seams and a knit collar. Almost as comfortable as t-shirts they are a summer wardrobe staple for me.  I wore them every week but then they shrank in the length. They became uncomfortably short. They were too short to tuck in and too short to wear outside my jeans. While I was out on a date with hubs last night, I had a brilliant idea. What about adding crochet trim to the the bottom of the shirts. If it is crocheted in place and not sewn on then it would look as though it was always there. The shirts were headed to Goodwill since they were too short, what would it cost me to try? So I whipped out my ruler and made 1/4 inch dots with a pencil along the hem on the wrong side of the shirt.

2014-07-08 10.35.11

I then tried several different methods of putting a blanket stitch along the bottom of the shirt. The preferred method (for me) was to use the smallest double pointed steel knitting needle to poke a hole from the wrong side to the right side. You could also use a dull needle point needle. Then I crocheted along the bottom edge of the shirt. I ended up only chaining twice between each stitch because three chains made it scalloped, like this.

2014-07-08 10.35.20

When I reached the end of the shirt at the side seam. I chained twice and turned. This row was simply two single crochets in each blanket stitch. The third row was double crochet in the top of each single crochet. Chain four and turn.

2014-07-08 11.38.16

In the photo above you can see the starting row of blanket stitch, the row of single crochet and then the third row of double crochet.

2014-07-08 11.54.44-1

4th row.

Double crochet in the third double crochet from the edge. (You are skipping one double crochet across). Then chain 1, double crochet in the second double crochet across. It creates a grid across the bottom of the shirt. You will repeat this row 2 more times. On the last row chain four and turn.

So you will have three rows of the grid and then the edging. I really didn’t want a frilly edging so I opted for a light scalloped picot border.

The fifth row sets the foundation for the scallops and picots.

5th row

skip one double crochet and single crochet to the next double all the way across.

6th row single crochet 2 times into the first scallop foundation. Singel crochet again and chain three, single crochet to the same place and then sc 1 more time. There should be six single crochets. The two stitches in the middle will have the picot added to the top. It should look like this.

2014-07-08 13.05.18-1

 

Weave in all of your ends and you should have successfully added about two inches to the bottom of your polo top. Then repeat this to the front hem of your shirt. Wash the whole thing and hang it to dry. You can shape the crochet lace while it dries and it should reduce ironing. I wouldn’t put it in the dryer as the lace might shrink. Here is mine drying. It will still need a light ironing.

2014-07-08 18.19.14

Yay, I am so  happy. I can’t wait to wear it. I have two more polo shirts to fix.I’m off to watch some more netflix and off to fix my knit shirts.

talk to you later,

Karen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Hooked Rug

Every once in a while I will stop by an estate sale. I stopped at two today. I found this beautiful hand hooked rug. The date says ’54 so I am assuming that it means 1954 and not 1854. I really don’t think it is that 100 years old, but I really don’t know much about it.

2014-06-12 17.39.41

It is a punched rug with wool strips instead of yarn. It has never been used as you can see that the burlap backing isnt tacked down to the back of the run like it would be if it had been used.2014-06-013

It is a little old fashioned and somewhat out of style but I love the color shading in it. I also found a wonderful bucket of crochet cotton thread in various sizes and colors.

2014-06-12 17.29.44

Quite a nice selection of threads. It was a fun day though my feet hurt today after all the walking.

Talk to you later,

Karen

 

Scrap Busting with Quilts

IMG_0994-001Quilts are a time honored way to use scraps. These quilts were made by the women in my family, Grandmothers and Great- Grandmothers and I think one Great-Great Grandmother.

IMG_1044

 

IMG_1032-001

This sun bonnet sue is one of my favorites.

IMG_1002-002

 

IMG_0988-002

IMG_1008-003

 

My Grandma was a member of a quilting group. They would meet once a week or month and quilt the top of a member’s quilt.  It was a social time and also a time to get much needed work done. These quilts were made for use and they kept the family warm on the cold winter nights.  My Aunts can sit down and tell you where each piece of fabric came from. They came from a time when women made their own clothes and skill with a needle and thread was valued. My Mom taught me to sew and I am teaching my girls or at least making sure they learn the basics.  Sewing is expensive  these days unlike my Grandmothers’ days when everyone had to have some skill at sewing.

I have been thinking about sewing some quilts with my scraps. I have sewn one quilt top that is just strips of fabric but the more complicated patterns are calling to me. I need to baste all the layers together but I keep putting it off.

Talk to you later,

Karen

 

# 47 of 100 items in 100 days!

I made these pretty pot holders for my daughter. I will store them for her until she needs them. She cut them out for her quilt and they were left over. They are  bright and colorful.

IMG_1660

 

Talk to you later,

Karen